30 min Webcasts

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Tags: plagiarism, Turnitin, Turnitin webcast

Webcasts on the latest trends and technologies on preserving academic integrity, preventing plagiarism, and improving the quality of student written work

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Office Hours: Students Share Successful Feedback Tips

What do students say about the types of feedback they receive? Join us for this special ""office hours," held by students who will share their insights into the approaches, strategies, and technologies that work best for improving their success.

This session features a panel of students and recent graduates from UC Berkeley who will discuss the impact of the types and timing of feedback they receive as well as the feedback they find most meaningful and helpful. This discussion is framed around a study of 1,000 students conducted by Turnitin entitled, "Closing the Gap: What Students Say About Instructor Feedback."

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Why Students Plagiarize

In the recent Turnitin webcast, "Why Students Plagiarize," educational psychologist and author, Jason Stephens explores why students cheat even when they believe it is morally wrong. He talks about three common motivational patterns that drive academic dishonesty:

  • Under Pressure: High performance goals or high extrinsic motivation
  • Under-interested: Low mastery goals or low intrinsic motivation
  • Unable: Low efficacy or low perceived sense of ability

The Webcast can only be accessed after filling out a form with your first and last name, work e-mail, Institution type, primary role and software purchasing role (there is a "no role" option). The Webcast link will be e-mailed to you.

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Jason M Stephens is an Associate Porfessor of Educational Psychology at the University of Connecticut.

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More than Words: Using Voice Comments to Provide Effective Feedback

What’s the value of feedback on student written work if that feedback goes unread? With more writing instruction and evaluation going online, the opportunity to provide feedback through different modalities has opened the door for instructors to tap into more diverse options for reaching students.

This 30-minute webcast explores the benefits—and the increased efficacy—of using voice comments to provide feedback on student writing.

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Presented by Meagan Kittle Autry, Assistant Director of the First Year Writing Program and the Campus Writing and Speaking Program at North Carolina State University; Renee Bangerter, a Professor of English at Saddleback College and Jason Chu, Senior Education Manager at Turnitin.

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Peer Editing and the Writing Process

How to integrate peer review exercises to advance student writing and encourage lifelong learning.

This 30-minute webcast explores how to integrate peer review exercises to advance student writing.

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Engaging the Brain: Teaching Critical Thinking with Student Engagement

Research and practices for engaging the students' brain to actually improve their ability to think critically.

Research suggests that academics educators are the ones failing in teaching students to think critically. Methodology may have something to do with it even though we often want to blame students for their lack of college readiness. This webcast will provide research and practices for engaging the students' brain to actually improve their ability to think critically.

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