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'Fairytale' Highlands: The view from 12,000 feet

Flying from Edinburgh to Stornoway recently, I captured the following stunning views of the Highlands. Fog and low cloud filled into the glens like a rising and invading ocean, but the Munro peaks remained glorious and resplendent in the sunshine, just like Greenland nunataks. Here I have identified some of the mountain summits:

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1) Looking south across Rannoch Moor

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2) North-west across The Trossachs to Ben Lui and Ben Cruachan (near Oban).

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3) The Nevis Range and the Great Glen.

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4) Now looking eastwards (from the other side of the aeroplane): Fog winds its way through the Pass of Drumochter

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5) The Fara and Dalwhinnie (the bow waves indicate the fog is flowing upwards from the south, and perhaps is sloshing in seiche fashion e.g. https://youtu.be/liwEP03SgVw?t=4 and https://youtu.be/bWKiRsHSBFw?t=1)

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6) A Broken Spectre 'Glory' from the fog top indicates that the fog droplets were 'old', with a variation in size of more than 20%.

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7) And finally, out of the clouds: Carn Eighe / Sgurr na Lapich with a rather thin snow cover for the time of year.

A radiosounding taken at Abermarle, Northumberland (which was also lying under the fog layer) at 12z on this day shows a strong temperature and humidity inversion at 700-800m. The air temperature was -1.1degC at 766m with 99% relative humidity, whereas at 1050m it was a shocking +8.2degC but with a relative humidity of only 30%.

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@eddy_weather, Stornoway, Scotland, 24 January 2017